Category Archives: Muzzleloaders

46 medals won with Pedersoli guns at the European Championships

A week has passed since the muzzle loading guns went silent in Barcelos, Portugal closing the MLAIC European Championships of this year. 230 shooters gathered from all around Europe to celebrate historical shooting. We were there also of course, and it was so good to see all the enthusiasm the black powder shooters share. Muzzle loading is our language of communication and we are all happy and lucky we can speak it.

The exceptional performance of the shooters amazes us each time we see them compete. Shooting high 90s with guns designed or even manufactured sometimes more than 200 years ago is something that earn respect. We are also very proud seeing so many people choosing our guns. And this is not just the question of accuracy. To score a winning score needs years of training with the same gun, firing that pistol or rifle many-many thousand times. Seeing so many Pedersoli guns at the ranges clarifies we are on the right track, and the conversation with you helped us so much.

But let’s see now what we have, let’s see the gifts our shooters awarded our company, with winning European Championships medals.

We won 5 gold medals, 7 silver, and 5 bronze medals in single events:

Discipline Shooter Nationality Score Gun
GOLD
VETTERLI MASSING GER 100 Bristlen Morges
MINIE BARBAULT FRA 94 1857 Württembergischen
COMINAZZO VENTE FRA 93 LE Page
MANTON LOTSPEICH GER 39 Mortimer
LORENZONI VIGOROUX FRA 46 Mortimer
SILVER
MIQUELET DEBERITZ SUI 94 AN IX
MINIE RUFENACHT SUI 94 1857 Württembergischen
PENNSYLVANIA MASSING GER 97 Swiss Match
COMINAZZO ANSAMAA FIN 93 LE Page
MARIETTE LAMBERT BEL 96 Remington Pattern
MANTON LANG GER 39 Mortimer
LORENZONI LOTSPEICH GER 44 Mortimer
BRONZE
LAMARMORA NYITRAI HUN 96 1857 Württembergischen
MIQUELET NORDHAGEN NOR 93 AN IX
PENNSYLVANIA JURZA SVK 97 Cub Dixie
MANTON CRIX GBR 39 Mortimer
LORENZONI WILLMS GER 42 Mortimer

 

Please take a closer look to the performance of Vladimir Jurza from Slovakia. He won the bronze medal with equalling score of 97 with one of our cheapest guns, the Cub Dixie, proving that no matter the price, Pedersoli guns always deliver match grade quality!

Pedersoli muzzleloaders in the hands of excellent shooters score another 8 gold, 11 silver and 10 bronze medals in team events:

TEAMS
WOGDON
FINLAND 2/3 L.P+L.P
GERMANY 2/3 LP+LP
SLOVAK 2/3 LP+LP
EL ALAMO
BELGIUM 1/3 Ped remingt
PORTUGAL 1/3 Ped remingt
PETERLONGO
GERMANY 1/3 Ped remingt
MAGENTA
FRANCE 1/3 Mauser
GERMANY 2/3 maus+maus
FINLAND 3/3 maus+maus+maus
KOSSUTH
GERMANY 2/3 swiss m+swiss m
HUNGARY 3/3 swiss+swiss+mort
AUSTRIA 1/3 jaeger
AMAZON
SPAIN 1/3 gibbs
RIGBY
SPAIN 1/3 gibbs
PFORZHEIM
GERMANY 1/3 B.Morges
SLOVAK REP 1/3 B.Morges
HUNGARY 2/3 B.Morges + Tryon
HALIKO
NORWAY 3/3 AN IX+AN IX+ AN IX
FINLAND 2/3 AN IX+AN IX
GERMANY 3/3 AN IX+ AN IX+AN IX
LUCCA
FRANCE 1/3 MORTIMER
SWITZERLAND 2/3 MORTIM+MORTIM
ENFIELD
FRANCE 1/3 MAUSER
GERMANY 1/3 MAUSER
HAWKER
GERMANY 2/3 MORTIM+MORTIM
FRANCE 2/3 MORTIM+MORTIM
BATESVILLE
AUSTRIA 1/3 MORTIMER
SPAIN 1/3 MORTIMER
FRANCE 1/3 MORTIMER
TOTAL TEAMS 8 11 10

 

Dear Shooters! Congratulations to all the participants. Thanks for keeping the flame alive! And we are especially proud of the Pedersoli shooters! Well done Ladies and Gentlemen!

The new Pedersoli Whitworth rifle

Some good news to post: we have just started the production of the iconic long range military target rifle of the mid 19th century. Sir Joseph Whitworth, an excellent engineer experimented with various rifling methods to extend the range of the muzzle loading rifle muskets. In the 1850s he designed a small calibre fast twist hexagonal bore rifle, that started the age of long range sport shooting as well. This rifle proved extremely effective in the hands of the Confederate sharpshooters also.

Our reproduction features the original 1:20″ twist hexagonal rifling. The stock is oiled American walnut, and we are really proud of this beauty. We hope to have some range reports also soon.

The most accurate way of measuring your powder charges

How to measure blackpowder accurately? That’s an interesting question for all of us blackpowder shooters I think. And the answer is sometimes controversial. Some say measuring by weight is the only accurate way, and measuring only by volume is the evidence of a careless shooter. I believe that the truth is somewhere in the middle.

Adjustable measure: quick and handy way of measuring the powder charges. A fine range companion, but can be inaccurate because of the rough scale of the piston.
Adjustable measure: quick and handy way of measuring the powder charges. A fine range companion, but can be inaccurate because of the rough scale of the piston.

To have a clear view on this topic we first have to understand the working principles of the blackpowder. First of all blackpowder is not a compound but a mix of various ingredients like coal, potassium nitrate and sulphur. The process of making granulated blackpowder did not change too much in the past centuries. The strength and quality of the powder will depend on the quality of the ingredients, the mixing ratio, and size of corns.

A powder flask: you must have a few of them for sure, but the volume of the measured charge can change depending on how much powder you have in the flask and hard you push your finger on the spout.
A powder flask: you must have a few of them for sure, but the volume of the measured charge can change depending on how much powder you have in the flask and how hard you push your finger on the spout.

The black powder particles do not explode but burn on the outer surface, while large amount of gases are generated. Therefore the more surface you have, the more gas the charge generates. So if you measure by volume and replace the 2Fg powder with 3Fg powder using the same volumetric measure you will have more gas, more pressure, and higher muzzle velocity.

A bench mounted volumetric measure: quick and easy way, but the volume and weight of charge is depending on how much powder you have in the reservoir. Also note that many makers do not recommend using their measure with blackpowder.
A bench mounted volumetric measure: quick and easy way, but the volume and weight of charge is depending on how much powder you have in the reservoir. Also note that many makers do not recommend using their measure with blackpowder.

The weight of the powder can change in time. It can absorb moisture from the air, so the particles will be heavier than when you first opened the box. So if you only rely on the scale, your volume can be different in June, than it was in February from the same box of powder. And more volume means more particles, more particles mean more morning surface, and more burning surface means more gases, higher pressure and higher muzzle velocity. So the question is obvious: should we just forget the scales and stick with volumetric measures?

An old powder laddle: good and fast way to fill the vials, but be careful how many times you tap the measure.
An old powder laddle: good and fast way to fill the vials, but be careful how many times you tap the measure.

The answer is simply no, because measuring by volume can be inaccurate. If you use ladle style measure, the charge will depend on how the powder settles. If you use a bench mounted volumetric measure the charge will also change depending on how much powder you have in the container. If you use a powder flask, the same thing happens: the more powder you have in it the more it will compress the charge in the spout. In this case it also matters how strong you push your finger on the mouth of the spot: the volume will be reduced if the finger pressure is harder.

My method for having consistent loads is the following:

1st Always use your volumetric measure to fill 5 of your vials.

First step: measure by volume.
First step: measure by volume.

2nd Weight these charges on a traditional scale and determinate the average.

3rd Now use your volumetric measure to weight your charges but check each of them on the scale as well. You can use any digital or analogue scales, but avoid the cheap low quality ones, stick with scales designed for weighing powder.

4th Add or remove some powder is necessary to have exactly the average load weight. A trickler is a great help in this job.

Second step: check the weight on a scale
Second step: check the weight on a scale

This method guarantees you will have the equal volume, and measuring all charges by weight as a second step is used to check the consistency of the work.

This method offers exceptional accuracy regardless of the season, but I also have to tell you that I only use this method for the most important occasions. But remember: the volumetric measure is the key of the project not registering the weight of the charge. For everyday practice and fun shooting I stick with skipping the scale check part of course.